Enter the Dragon (1973)

Enter the Dragon (1973)

GENRESAction,Crime,Drama,Thriller
LANGEnglish,Cantonese
ACTOR
Bruce LeeJohn SaxonJim KellyAhna Capri
DIRECTOR
Robert Clouse

SYNOPSICS

Enter the Dragon (1973) is a English,Cantonese movie. Robert Clouse has directed this movie. Bruce Lee,John Saxon,Jim Kelly,Ahna Capri are the starring of this movie. It was released in 1973. Enter the Dragon (1973) is considered one of the best Action,Crime,Drama,Thriller movie in India and around the world.

Enter the Dragon revolves around 3 main characters; Lee, a man recruited by an agency to investigate a tournament hosted by Han, since they believe he has an Opium trade there. Roper and Williams are former army buddies since Vietnam and they enter the tournament due to different problems that they have. It's a deadly tournament they will enter on an island. Lee's job is to get the other 2 out of there alive.

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Enter the Dragon (1973) Reviews

  • Immortal (***** stars out of five)

    dee.reid2004-07-27

    In the years since his bizarre and tragic death, martial arts legend and master Bruce Lee has become a sort of icon within the Kung-fu movie circuit. The last film that he completed before his death, 1973's "Enter the Dragon," has become not only a masterful showcase for Lee's talents (both fighting and acting), but in the 31 years since its release has become perhaps the definitive martial arts movie of all time. Lee, in his first and last English-speaking performance, stars as a martial arts expert who is recruited by the British government to infiltrate an island fortress, under the cover of being invited to a martial arts tournament, to investigate a possible slavery/drug ring led by a former nemesis of his. Indeed something is amiss at this isolated island fortress, as he discovers that his nemesis Han (Shih Kien) is the host of the tournament and is also the leader of the same gang that murdered his sister. Soon enough, Lee, together with two other martial artists, Roper (John Saxon) and Williams (Jim Kelly), go to work kicking a** everywhere until the final showdown with the murderous, one-handed villain Han in the classic "Hall of Mirrors" fight sequence. "Enter the Dragon," a joint American-Chinese production, was intended to be Bruce Lee's introduction to Western audiences, but due to his tragic death just weeks before the film's American release, we will never know what he would have been capable of here in the states. Even more tragically, his son Brandon Lee would experience a similar fate just like his father only 20 years later with "The Crow." There are so many classic fight scenes, which I can watch over and over without them ever becoming boring. Many of them still hold up very well, especially by 2004's standards, where fight scenes are mostly digitally enhanced or involve "wire" or "Matrix-fu" to make up for lack of actual stunt work; plus one has to remember that this film was made in 1973, in the days before wirework would become dominant in today's martial arts cinema. The "Cavern Fight" is probably my favorite fight sequence of all time, in any martial arts movie. Many of the fights in this movie, more specially the ones where Lee is involved, have a surreal feeling to them. He brings a kind of grace to his action scenes that have yet to be topped by any actor alive today. Lee even brings many of his own personal philosophies to this film, which makes much sense and perhaps help to understand some of the more philosophical elements to the story. But more than anything, this was Bruce Lee's entrée to Americans; many people, including myself, were introduced to martial arts cinema through "Enter the Dragon." There are also several cameos made by future martial arts stars that would eventually reach stardom, most notably Jackie Chan (as a henchman during the "Cavern Fight" sequence who has his neck broken by Lee) and Sammo Hung (as Lee's sparring partner in the opening fight sequence). I could go on and on about what makes this movie immortal, but I feel I should let you see what makes it great. Bruce Lee was forever immortalized with this film and it will be cherished and praised forever.

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  • Don't think! Feeeeeeelll!

    Golgo-132006-01-05

    When it comes to kung fu, Bruce Lee is a legend. When it comes to kung fu cinema, Enter the Dragon is the most highly regarded. In other words, you owe it to yourself to see this flick! The story is relatively simple but quite sufficient and sprinkled with humor. The locations and setting are wonderful as well. The characters are one of the main attractions here though, with the gambling but honorable Roper (John Saxon), the feisty and unorthodox (but effective!) Williams (Jim Kelly), Chinese Hercules Bolo, and the great baddie Han, the hand man. Bruce Lee's presence, of course, steals the show. While some of the fight scenes from Lee's Chinese Connection (I think that's the one) may rival the ones here, ETD is a far more well-rounded film. The variety of exciting fights are skillfully choreographed and there's not too much downtime from the action either; even in the flash back we have some excellent female butt-kicking. And you gotta love that 70's soundtrack! This is a classic action film that will never be forgotten. The two-disc DVD was loaded with goodies; you really couldn't ask for more, except for maybe a better commentary. Producer Paul Heller was dull, dry, and had little to offer.

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  • Still a classic three decades later

    oshram-32004-06-26

    Long held to be the grand-daddy of all martial arts films, Enter the Dragon was recently re- released on DVD with the full treatment – digital restoration, a few short scenes added back in, and interviews with all of the surviving cast, plus some extras about the film and a few interviews with Bruce Lee. Most of you have probably already seen it, as it's thirty years old, but even though the film is almost absurdly steeped in the 70s, it still holds up remarkably well. Aside from dangerously wide lapels and some corny era-related dialogue (most notably delivered by Jim Kelly, the film's only African American). Enter the Dragon still delivers the same powerful punch it did three decades ago. Of course, back then, it was merely the best martial arts film. Now, however, it is the chief testament to the grace and skill of Bruce Lee, and the only one of his four films that he had any sort of creative control over – and you can see the difference between this and his Hong Kong films easily. Lee does a Tony Danza and plays Mr. Lee, a shao-lin warrior who is recruited by a foreign government (it's assumed to be the English but is never explicitly stated) to infiltrate the island of a megalomaniac martial artist named Han (Kien Shih) who holds tournaments to find the best martial artists in the world. And because that's not enough motivation, it's also revealed that Han's bodyguard, Oharra (Robert Wall) killed Bruce's sister three years ago. So, like every Lee movie, there is a personal vendetta involved, and like every Lee film, Bruce's character asks forgiveness from his family for the deadly violence he is about to unleash. Along for the ride are gamblaholic Roper (John Saxon) and ghetto survivor Williams (Kelly). The plot seems like a contrivance now, but that was before it was copied to death in the last three decades. It's actually a plausible and somewhat clever excuse to show people what they came to see – Bruce Lee repeatedly kicking butt. From the opening fight scene (against Sammo Hung) through the fabulous finale where Lee single-handedly takes on half the island, the movie is a joy to watch on the physical level. It's the world's greatest martial artist at his peak, in a showcase perfectly designed for him. It was an ideal if unintentional shrine to the man. Lee is not merely content to let us watch him bash people, though; some of his philosophy penetrates the movie, which is probably the real reason why Enter the Dragon has stayed so fresh so long. Lee talks about spirituality with a young charge and even gives us an amusing and illustrative lesson in his 'art of fighting without fighting' – which is the credo of any real warrior. Lee also shows us the flip side; the show-offs and power-hungry who are only in it for the physical and material advantage. He takes care to show us how debased they are before dispatching them, however. While Saxon and the rest of the cast are perfectly acceptable (Jim Kelly overdoes it a bit, but oddly that fits the film), Lee is terrific in this piece. Bruce Lee was a riveting performer and nowhere is that better demonstrated than in this movie. It's a testament to his legacy that three decades later, no one has come close to his skill, and people are still stealing ideas from him (Kill Bill, etc.). It gives one pause while watching Enter the Dragon to think of just what Bruce Lee could have accomplished had he lived. I suppose those who don't like martial arts wouldn't care for this film, but I've seen it convert even unbelievers before. Lee is that good, and that charismatic, that you can't help but be drawn to him. Certainly his greatest film is worth checking out again on this spiffy new re- release. Even if you're not the biggest martial arts fan, how often do you get to check out a legend at the top of his game?

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  • .....simply the best

    Dean Routledge1999-03-19

    Even though it is more than 25 years since Enter the Dragon was first released, to this day it is still hailed as the landmark of martial arts films. Used primarily as a vehicle for the late, great Bruce Lee this movie has a thin plot, little actual character development and the acting isn't fantastic.....it was never meant to be another Citizen Kane. Its merit lies purely in the action content. If you were to ask any learned martial artist I'm sure that 9 out of 10 would tell you that the fight sequences are unparalleled, even today. The fluidity of Lee is astounding. Unlike most martial arts films of that time the fighting is very realistic, and has a somewhat visceral quality. There is also the use of traditional Oriental weapons (nunchaku, escrima sticks, etc..), although the British censors in their wisdom have seen fit the cut the nunchaku sequence, and I'm afraid, like any censored movie, it just isn't the same watching when you know you aren't getting the full monty, so to speak. Still, on the whole one of my personal favourites and a must see for any action or seventies film fan. If you get the opportunity see the remastered American version with added footage....I've got one,envy me!!!

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  • 'Enter The Dragon' is essential viewing for all 1970s buffs!

    Infofreak2004-06-12

    'Enter The Dragon' was a massive part of my childhood back in the 1970s. As a pre-teen Bruce Lee was just about the coolest thing I'd ever seen. Maybe only Bond (Sean Connery Bond!) and Charlton Heston as 'The Omega Man' came close. Like 'The Omega Man' this movie is one that I find difficult to be objective about. The plot is simplistic, the acting is variable, but the action and the LOOK of it make it an all time classic. Let's face it this is a kung fu movie, and what the audience wants is exciting fight scenes. 'Enter The Dragon' has them and then some! I'm not sure whether I'd describe it as "the greatest martial arts movie ever made" (as many people do), but it's certainly one of the most entertaining I've ever seen. The only other one I've seen that comes close is 'Iron Monkey', but as good as it was, it obviously didn't have the one thing that makes this movie legendary - Bruce Lee. Lee is without a doubt the greatest ku fu fighter to step in front of a movie camera. Handsome and charismatic, this movie was to be his introduction to mainstream Hollywood audiences. He died unexpectedly just weeks before it premiered in America. It seems certain that he would have become a superstar, bigger than Jackie Chan (who incidentally has a brief cameo here) is today. Whenever Lee is on the screen you can't take your eyes off him - he's that good. You don't need any other reason to watch this movie than Bruce Lee, but having John Saxon ('Planet Of Blood', 'Tenebrae') co-star is an added treat, and Jim Kelly is super cool. After the enormous success of 'Enter The Dragon' director Robert Clouse made 'Black Belt Jones' with him, another 70s kung fu classic, but Kelly never really fulfilled his potential, and instead made cheesy but fun b-grade vehicles like 'Black Samurai' and 'Black Belt Jones 2'. I also love Han, the tongue-in-cheek 'Dr No' inspired villain played by Kien Shih. 'Enter The Dragon' is essential viewing for all 1970s buffs. It had a major impact on pop culture and it's still great wonderful to watch thirty years after it was originally released. To say I highly recommend this movie is an understatement!

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