The Final Cut (2004)

The Final Cut (2004)

GENRESDrama,Sci-Fi,Thriller
LANGEnglish
ACTOR
Robin WilliamsJim CaviezelMira SorvinoMimi Kuzyk
DIRECTOR
Omar Naim

SYNOPSICS

The Final Cut (2004) is a English movie. Omar Naim has directed this movie. Robin Williams,Jim Caviezel,Mira Sorvino,Mimi Kuzyk are the starring of this movie. It was released in 2004. The Final Cut (2004) is considered one of the best Drama,Sci-Fi,Thriller movie in India and around the world.

It's sometime in the near future. Largely on affordability, one in twenty people have Zoe implants inserted at birth, they manufactured by EYE Tech. The implants record what the host sees over his entire life. It is the job of a cutter to edit the footage post-mortem into a rememory for loved ones, it the official record of only the good, editing out for posterity the bad, the ugly and especially the very ugly. Ethically, cutters cannot combine footage from more than one implant for a rememory, cannot sell footage, and cannot have an implant himself. Alan Hakman is known to be the best cutter in the business in his seeming detachment from his subject matter, especially in needing to view that very ugly without judgment. He is arguably able to do so in being a loner, he having a cordial enough business relationship with fellow cutters, with his current girlfriend, Delila, the only other person in his life with some meaning to him. His work and that of his fellow cutters is getting more...

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The Final Cut (2004) Reviews

  • Great Idea, Great Story

    Vic_max2006-09-20

    I tend to like watching sci-fi movies even though most are really bad. What a wonderful surprise it was to come across this movie. The movie is well written with believable characters, dialog and plot. The concept alone is fantastic and the story does a wonderful job of exploring the many implications and aspects of it - both at a social and personal level. Although the movie seems like it might be slow-paced, it opens with a zinger and eventually ends up giving us surprise after surprise. In conjunction with a lot of intellectual intrigue, there is a lot of strong emotion that goes along with many of the scenes. It isn't perfect - there are some arguable problems with aspects of the story and characters, but for what one gets, I'm willing to focus on the positive here. Definitely worth checking out.

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  • A good concept but a mediocre flick----5/10

    Sfpsycho4152005-03-13

    I have always been a Robin Williams fan. From watching him goof around in Mrs. Doubtfire when i was a kid to seeing him actually creep me out in One Hour Photo, probably his best movie to date. So i am willing to see anything he has to offer. I got a chance to see The Final Cut for free, so i took it. The plot seemed real interesting and it was a first. Later into the movie though, the plot was getting cut more than people's memories. Williams romance with Mira Sorvino (which was gag-worthy to begin with) doesn't have any closure, and the "cutting" procedure and the whole "chip in the brain" thing didn't seem too thought out. Robin Williams is good as always and he tries his best to keep you interested, and the opening of the movie was promising. I even think with a little work that director Omar Naim can make some really quality flicks. This one, however, seems like it was cut together from a better movie. Which is a shame because it was a really cool idea. 5/10

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  • A lot of unfulfilled promise, but still worth watching

    BrandtSponseller2005-04-25

    Set during an unspecified future era, or perhaps an "alternate universe" present era, The Final Cut posits a world in which "first person viewpoint" computer chip implants are possible for those who can afford it. These record a person's entire life from a first person viewpoint--the "camera" sees what the person sees, hears what they hear. The intention is to have an accurate, documentary-like record after the person dies. These are presented as films at their funerals. Citizens known as "cutters" (just a slang for a film editor) pare down one's life to a feature length presentation. There are also those who protest the implants. The Final Cut is the story of the latter days of a cutter, Alan W. Hakman (Robin Williams). While The Final Cut is enjoyable enough, it has tremendous squandered potential. As one would expect, Williams turns in an incredible performance, but the script, by writer/director Omar Naim, could have used a lot of work. The premise is fabulous. It opens many philosophical and psychological cans of worms. Some are dealt with, but only cursorily. Surely cutters go through a lot of emotional trauma as they vicariously experience the lows and the mundanities of other person's lives. Naim shows us this briefly with a recording of someone who was an abuser. But as soon as he shows us this material, he drops it. The film is advertised as a thriller. How much more exciting would it have been to embed Hakman in the middle of some grand, suspenseful plot, the details of which became known to him through data from an implant? As one of the opponents of the implant technology remarks, the implants have changed the way people relate to each other. That is a good point--it would have a profound impact on that. So why aren't we shown instances of this in the film? This could have been another hinge for a very intriguing, tense plot. There are also issues of invasion of privacy, surveillance paranoia, consent (the implants are shown being put into infants and being permanent), and "misuse" of the data. Most of these are barely touched. Often they're only broached with a single comment, or a protester's sign. Other fascinating issues brought up by the idea of the technology are not even mentioned. Surely, such technology would prove to be invaluable as evidence in crimes. And surely many people, especially victims, would voluntarily offer a "tap" into their implants so they can be witnesses. Why not comment on these kinds of possibilities? The Final Cut is also oddly understated with such a far-reaching sci-fi premise in this era of rubber reality films. A number of plot points, such as the one involving Louis Hunt, have almost disappointingly mundane resolutions. For that matter, for a sci-fi film set in the future or an alternate reality, there isn't much that is different about the world except for the implants. Probably the lack of differences was due to budget. It costs a lot of money to build alternate realities. This might sound far too negative for the film to warrant a 7 out of 10 from me, which is equivalent to a "C" letter grade. Much of the film is saved by the performances. In combination with direction that is more often than not interesting and unusual, it's easy to focus on the promise of the premise rather than the unfulfilled extensions of the same. Hakman, and presumably the other cutters, have odd dispositions. Their task is to make everyone look good--like a mortician making up a mangled body so it's "presentable" at a funeral. They spend hour upon hour as voyeurs. They are something like archivists, but also have to play detective. It makes them strangely aloof and dour. It's difficult for them to have relationships. Naim gets in a couple cracks that portray the cutters and their social relationships as similar to geeky "Internet addicts". This is all good stuff, and it's excellently played by Williams. The flow of the film is a bit odd, and especially the ending (which I praised for its relative nihilism) is eventually abrupt in a way that doesn't exactly work (and I usually love abrupt endings). Being generous, we could take the wonky flow as a "level-removed" kind of self-reference. Of course Naim was faced with cutting the film to make it look good, but it's a bit awkward and arbitrary-feeling, just as a cutter's work would likely be when faced with having to produce a coherent 90-minute film out of 80 years' worth of material. Being less generous, Naim simply needs to learn how to better tell a story, and there was no intention of real-world reflexivity with his fictional material. The Final Cut is worth seeing, especially if you're a Robin Williams fan as I am, but it's a disappointment considering what it could have been.

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  • Loved the film's moral dilemas

    uap2004-04-21

    I saw "The Final Cut" at the Berlin Film Festival, I was surprisingly absorbed by the questions raised. The plot evoked feelings I felt after reading, George Orwell's, "1984". The questions of privacy and morality. As a first film, Omar Naim does a credible job at directing Robin Williams, Mira Sorvino, and Jim Caviziel. Their preformances matched the morbidity of the world created in the film. Some of Robin's most reserved and pulled back acting, great seeing Caviziel transform from Jesus to a villan. Thom Bishops who I never heard of before was suprisingly impressive as the light point in the film. To me, this film comes at a time when this subject is pertinent as social commentary on where our society is headed. There was a couple of plot holes though, and I felt that the romance between Mira Sorvino's character and Robin's could have been more developed.

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  • Don't believe everything you read about this movie

    RWFansite2004-02-16

    I've seen the movie several times in Berlin February 2004. The first time I watched it I was blown away by the end of the movie. The last couple of scenes have so much power, great music and awesome acting performances (actually the whole movie does). The ending was great and I had to think a little longer what I should think about the rest of the movie. Of course I liked it, but I didn't now how much, till I watched the movie for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th time. It's an absolutely awesome movie and it got better and better everytime I watched it. The camerawork is amazing, directing from Omar is perfect and the acting performances (especially Robin and Thom Bishops) are the best of their carreer. I can't help it, but I have to compare this movie with One Hour Photo. Compared to that movie, this one is more thrilling and I think a lot more accessible for a lot of people. The great thing about Robin is that in this movie he gives the other actors the opportunity to shine. I've read several reviews that were negative about everything they could be negative about. Omar should've been a bad director and writer, Robin was robotic and the set decoration didn't fit in. Well, I think Omar did a great job, Robins performance was even better than in One Hour Photo (and I thought Robins best performance was in One Hour Photo), the set decoration is very human and warm and the music by Brian Tyler is absolutely fantastic. Ok, one thing in the script/story may be doubtful, but I don't think that makes this movie instantly as bad as other critics say. I completely understood each character and I understood why they did things the way they did it. I hope this movie will get a lot of positive reviews soon, because everyone who worked on this project fully deserve it!

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