The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996)

The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996)

GENRESHorror,Sci-Fi,Thriller
LANGEnglish,Indonesian
ACTOR
David ThewlisMarlon BrandoVal KilmerFairuza Balk
DIRECTOR
John Frankenheimer,Richard Stanley

SYNOPSICS

The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996) is a English,Indonesian movie. John Frankenheimer,Richard Stanley has directed this movie. David Thewlis,Marlon Brando,Val Kilmer,Fairuza Balk are the starring of this movie. It was released in 1996. The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996) is considered one of the best Horror,Sci-Fi,Thriller movie in India and around the world.

Set in the year 2010, Dr. Moreau has successfully combined human and animal DNA to make a crossbreed animal. Well, as usual, something goes wrong and David Thewlis must try to stop it before it is too late. Originally rated R, but cut by Frankenheimer to allow "a wider audience".

The Island of Dr. Moreau (1996) Reviews

  • Sense of humor needed to watch this

    hgni1999-10-07

    This movie gets a bad rap -- viewers say Brando plain sucks and that it butchers a good Wells story. Perhaps the latter is true, but I consider Brando, as the mad doctor, a fine choice and, while he is rather subdued, he is still the candid, self-conscious actor we all know and love. He practically mumbles his lines as his mouth is lined with cotton and (probably) cheeseburgers. And, the scene where Brando plays piano along with his "pre Mini-Me" sidekick is a classic. Now, I know Brando refused to learn his lines for this movie and Kilmer is known for being a real ass to work with, but the in-production feuds add to the aura of this film. These characters aren't supposed to like each other and the tension fills the air. The special effects are top notch, albeit gruesome and a bit overdone. It all adds to the feel of the movie. I have this movie on tape and watch it again and again, alongside "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas," "Taxi Driver," "Rear Window" and "Dr. Strangelove." If you thought you shouldn't see this based on other user's comments, put your expectations aside and just enjoy!

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  • Fascinating mess of a movie

    Dodger-91999-12-22

    David Thewlis, looking like he's wandered in from another film, is totally miscast in this much-troubled version of the HG Wells classic. After being rescued by toothy vet Val Kilmer and taken to the eponymous location, our Mancunian UN hero comes across cat girl Fairuza Balk and the balloon-like doc (Marlon Brando), all pasty-faced and with an Ealing comedy accent. Marlon hasn't just been doing beached whale impressions on this exotic isle. You see, mad old Moreau has been messing around with gene-splicing and has created a race of humanoid beasts - courtesy of effects whiz Stan Winston. He controls them with electric shock implants and is so taken with his work, has little other defence when the beasts inevitably start running wild. In essence, it all goes a bit Jurassic Park. There are a few good points in this mish mash. A stunning opening titles scene - very necessary considering the lack of any adventure for the first 10 minutes; Thewlis' extraordinary presence; and an okay finale. In fact, any scenes without Brando and Kilmer are quite fascinating. This is partly down to the Richard Stanley screenplay which boasts some flashes of brilliance amid much re-worked studio editing and re-jigging. This is one of those films where the making of the movie is perhaps more intriguing than the final product. Stanley, the film's original director, was fired and banned from the set. He actually went back, dressed up as a dog man extra, and watched the rest of the production unfold. Had he been allowed to finish his directing chores and had final cut, the result would probably have been a thousand times better. However, John Frankenheimer does a fair job under the circumstances.

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  • Critically Pummelled Entertainment

    worldsofdarkblue2011-01-07

    Most people seem to dismiss it, if not hate it. Certainly the critics. But. really - we get a Brando performance that again displays his long-held dismissal of Hollywood-ism, we get Val Kilmer hamming it up joyously (even to the point of repeatedly doing Brando impressions), we get David Thewliss (a damn fine actor) actually playing the most important character with admirable commitment, we get cat-eyed Fairuza Balk (yum!), we get the great Ron Perlman, playing a beast yet again, pretty much stealing the movie, we get something that is Dr. Moreau's constant companion, becoming a pop-culture icon thanks to South Park - as Chef puts it "what the hell are you supposed to be? You don't look like anything". Outstanding photography, effective tropical suggestibility (you can almost feel the humidity), excellent animal make-up, some truly memorable scenes (the birthing scene, the Hyena-Moreau confrontation) and even a sense of philosophical examination. And though the story of this insane scientist attempting to humanize animals has been done several times, only this one goes to the extreme of showing us that he's even created a bunch of tiny rat people! What a loon. Too much enjoyment for a movie so slammed.

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  • Go rent it! WAY better than the negative reviews...

    Eric-12262001-09-03

    You will have to chalk me up as belonging to that camp of viewers who actually *wanted* to see a truly horrid film (as based on all the negative reviews) only to discover to our delight that there was a gem of a movie hiding there all along. For me, watching the film was a *great* escapist experience. I felt exactly what the character played by David Thewlis would have felt, had I been in a similar "lost in the middle of the ocean, end up on a strange island" sort of predicament. The movie did a superb job of instantly whisking me away to a strange and beautiful and ominous place - the Island of Dr. Moreau - and I found myself staying with the fantasy the whole way through. The cinematography was just beautiful, and if you have ever been in or near the tropics, the filming and the movie setting did an awesome job of conveying that hot, thick, humid, teeming-with-life feel that can only be found in the tropics. I really enjoyed the eery background music, it really added to the overall creepiness of the whole weird "mad-science-gone-amok" theme of the story. Plus that scene where David Thewlis first encounters Faruiza Balk, and she starts to dance to that utterly hypnotic and awesome Balinese music, was just too spine-tingling for words. I only regret that I haven't been able to locate any soundtrack information yet on the movie, so I don't know who played that song, but the whole scene was absolutely and truly memorable. I'd watch it again just for that song and dance scene alone. I noticed that many people didn't like the acting or the characterizations. I, on the other hand, felt that the four main characters (Brando, Kilmer, Thewlis, and Balk) were flawless in their depiction of a familiar tale. Brando was admittedly "weird" - but hey, give the guy his due, he was SUPPOSED to be a weird, crazed scientist. What were you expecting, the Maytag Repairman? Kilmer was deliciously evil, can't say enough good about Val Kilmer, he's always been one of my very favorite actors, and he DID NOT disappoint in this film, either. Balk, as mentioned above, was just awesome (and I REALLY liked the scene where she and "father" Brando had their moment of emotional bonding). Thewlis was right spot-on with his interpretation of an innocent "sane" observer who barely made it off this mad-house of an island without totally losing his own sanity. I think I would have done exactly as he had done, in his circumstances. Well Acted! Bravo! One scene that didn't work for me was early on when the man-beasts were shown to be delivering a hideous-looking baby from a hideous-looking beast-woman. I don't know, but somehow I felt that it should have been Dr. Moreau and Montgomery (Brando and Kilmer) who should have been the doctors doing the delivery. Nevertheless, it was a truly creepy scene. Finally, I thought the movie was well-stocked with thought-provoking comments on the morality of scientific experimentation. The scene at the dinner table, where Brando expounds on his personal views, comes to mind, as does the final parting comments, voiced by Thewlis. I had to watch the movie several times just to hear those words. They will REALLY make you think. I truly believe this movie should be seen and actively discussed by students at high school or college level - not just in science prep classes, but philosophy and social science courses as well. I don't care what the naysayers have to say, this was by no means an empty or shallow movie. So, go take a trip to the Island of Dr. Moreau. You won't come back unchanged....

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  • Messy but underrated

    Gary-1612000-01-23

    This wasn't as bad as I had been led to believe and was often nightmarish as well as gripping. I understand it was a troubled production and that may explain the uneven lurches in action. This film was saved by the excellent and committed performances by the actors who played the animals, who were really heartbreaking. Wells himself had an ambivalent attitude to the human race and was said to have had certain facist sympathies. However, Any philisophical points tended to be drowned by the rather garish direction. Brando's accent seemed wrong for the modern day setting of the film as well. A sad and distressing film that is well worth a look.

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